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[Airbus 380] The Super Jumbo A380 comes into service world wide.

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    You bring up some interesting points that I hadn't even thought of. Makes sense what you are saying, Dane.
    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

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      As far as my understanding goes, the Airbus 380 is now failing as a super jumbo: too big, too costly and another way of interpreting the economics of long hal flights.

      The B787 and the A350 however, are selling quite well, with order books full.

      Some Asian airlines is also now trying to sell of some of their A380's but the market is cold to say at least.

      What do you Ladies and Gentlemen think? Is the A380 a failure of concept?

      I tried finding a video on youtube that describes this change of economics, and I think this 10 minute film is the best I found:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NlIdzF1_b5M
      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
      Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
      Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

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      Comment


        It is really hitting the fan for Airbus. The early A380's are nearing the end of their lease contracts and most carriers are not extending. A380's will be entering the used market for the first time. Airbus may find the sale of new airplanes further hurt by competition from relatively new and inexpensive used A380's.

        Comment


          I agree. Perhaps not 'failure of concept' as such (seemed a good idea at the time), but clearly overtaken rapidly by enormous changes in global economics.

          It is a pity - I was rather enjoying pouring over A380 cabin layouts with almost the same enthusiasm I do ships' deck plans! The sheer size of the A380 aircraft enabled the various carriers to come up with much more than some tweaks in seat spacing - their own configurations tailored to their routes, clientele, and corporate image, resulting in interesting and often innovative cabin designs. (…The kind of things I mentioned in response to your recent blog entry, pakarang.)

          The You-Tube video makes a good job (once I had grasped the pronounciation of 'routes') of explaining the shift to 'long and skinny' and 'point to point' models in response to the longer range of smaller aircraft. Edinburgh gets mentioned several times!
          Last edited by Seagull; November 19th, 2016, 10:41.

          Comment


            It is hard to fault decisions made 25+ years ago. The decision appears to have been at least partially incorrect but the aircraft is still an incredible engineering feat.

            Part of their decision I think was guided by engine technology. Back then a engine of 70'000 lbs thrust was as big as it could be. Boeing was designing the 777 around two while Airbus needed four to meet their goals. Possibly difficult to see was that engines would successfully grow to over 115'000 lbs thrust. Now the 777 flies with 230'000 pounds of thrust on two engines while the A380 has 280'000 from four engines. How differently would things have turned out if Airbus pushed for larger engines and used just three or perhaps downsized a bit and used just two but retained the double decker configuration?

            Comment


              Thank you for your views and inputs on this subject! I find it so interesting right now, as I'm at the moment riding high on the whole operation of airlines industry.

              I especially like to thank Dane for the opinion on engine-thrusts, something I didn't even think about as of yet. But you make a very valid point there. There is no doubt in my mind that the whole airline industry is fast changing right now, from massive people carriers to fuel efficient and light weight point to point aircrafts.

              I know of a couple of airlines which bought - not leased - their A380's, and their problems finding someone to take over them. Even those that have leased such aircratfs, have problems getting out of their lease without having to throw more money down the drain.

              Then again, we have Emirates which expects to have a fleet of a 90 (THAT'S NINE-ZERO) A380's.... that is a massive fleet of A380 if you ask me. I wonder how they are coping with the changes right now. I have no idea.

              I also see the retirement of several other, relatively new Airbus models too: Thai Airways International have by now "gotten rid" of all their 35 A300's, all 4 A310, all 5 A320, 10 of their 27 A330 as well as all of their 10 A340's. Things are certainly changing fast right now.
              With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

              Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
              Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
              Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
              Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

              Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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                Further to the fast changing airline industry, I think this massive aircraft with 3 decks might not be the way to go either, especially when considering the future of A380.

                Three decks, and strangely looking but massive in it's own way:

                http://edition.cnn.com/2015/04/21/tr...ane/index.html
                With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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                  Yes, Emirates has been instrumental in getting the A380 this far. More notable is that Emirates is one of only 13 airlines operating the A380. That's not a healthy customer base. Emirates has been wielding unhealthy pressure on Airbus for a re-engine of the 380. Something pretty unprecedented for such a young aircraft and almost impossible to make work financially. So while they are a great customer they have been a great burden by forcing extremely tight pricing.

                  As for airlines not renewing their lease contracts. So far most have been early models that have design problems and reduced weight capacities that later models do not have. Returning an aircraft from lease involves returning it to full life condition which is extremely expensive. So, airlines must be thinking long and hard about returning those aircraft so early. As a side note. In case you've ever wondered what an airline pays for a A380. Singapore Airlines pays 1.7 million a month in rent for their first A380.

                  Comment


                    Thank you so much Dane, for those inputs. I was aware of the monthly costs for the A380 rental, through another airlines which operates the same relatively early type of the aircraft. It seems like the future of this new queen of the skies may not be as long-lived as for the former queen, the 747 work-horse.

                    It may still be early to conclude on anything but as we soke about further up, the industry is quickly changing and I think all airlines, regardless of aircraft in their fleet, must pay full attention in class.
                    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                    Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                    Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                    Comment


                      I think the world still has need for very large passenger aircraft though it is a limited market. Right now carriers like Emirates, Ethad and others in the region are best to take advantage of the plane. Mideast airports and airlines are in a great position to connect Asia and Europe but they don't have much of a short haul or domestic market like other carriers. For those airlines so focused on long haul, pseudo hub & spoke routes the A380 is great. There are several cities in western China and even Bishkek, Kyrgystan that may enter as new "perfectly located" hubs to connect Europe and Asia whose location can allow most areas to be served with current twin engine aircraft. Economic success or not aircraft like the A380 and Concord are still incredible feats of engineering. At their worst they are great stepping stones to the future.

                      Comment


                        Inflight engine explosion on Air France in mid-Atlantic yesterday... thankfully, all is well with everybody on board!

                        https://airwaysmag.com/airlines/air-...ngine-failure/

                        www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-41454712

                        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                        Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                        Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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                          Not the view I want to see when I look the window.
                          Good that it went well, considering which structural damage loose parts from the engine could cause.
                          Ĝistein

                          If at first you don’t succeed, skydiving is not for you...

                          Comment


                            Agree.... this is not the view I would like to see outside my window, on any aircraft.

                            The engines of the A380 have had some problems up to now - wasn't it another one as well in Asia some years ago with a fanblade failure?
                            With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                            Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                            Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                            Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                            Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

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                              I think this is the third major engine incident and the second uncontained failure. This kind of publicity does not bode well for the A-380's future.

                              Comment


                                Third event already?

                                Singapore Airlines flight SQ026, Qantas flight 32 and now Air France flight 66... is this correct, or are there more?
                                With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                                Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                                Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                                Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                                Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                                Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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